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We give here a list of current (F18,S19) Assistant and Associate USCMS faculty (or equivalent), along with abstracts for talks they are interested in giving.

Assistant Professors (or equivalent)

Ted Kolberg, Florida State:

A Particle Flow Calorimeter for the CMS High Luminosity Upgrade: The upgraded CMS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC will integrate 10 times the amount of luminosity of the original experiment. With this large increase in luminosity we will significantly expand our understanding of Higgs physics, and enable new searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Along with these opportunities come significant challenges in coping with the high event rate, large amounts of pile up, and harsh radiation environment. The upgraded CMS endcap calorimeter will adopt a highly segmented design, optimized for use in particle flow reconstruction, with built in capabilities for precision timing. An overview of the project will be presented.

Phil Harris, MIT:

Hadronically Identified and Generated, after a Generation: Standard model production of the Z (or W) boson decaying to light quarks has not been observed in a hadron collider; it was thought to be impossible. We present a new technique to observe these productions and we observe a clear W and Z peak. With the addition of Machine Learning, we apply this approach to resonances decaying to b-quarks and present, for the first time, the Z boson decaying to b-quarks in a single jet and the first measurement of gluon fusion produced Higgs bosons decaying to b-quarks. Additionally, we discuss how we can further improve this Higgs boson measurement by identifying events directly on custom FPGA based electronics as part of the CMS trigger upgrade. We present a new framework to perform Machine Learning algorithms at incredibly high speeds on FPGA processing elements.

Toyoko Orimoto, Northeastern:

Exploring the High Energy Frontier with Precision Electromagnetic Calorimetry: CMS ECAL & the Search for di-Higgs Production: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, located at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), was designed with the goals of elucidating the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking and discovering new physics at the high energy frontier. A crucial component of the discovery of the Higgs boson was the excellent energy resolution of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), which is made of 75k scintillating lead tungstate crystals. Despite the discovery of the Higgs, a number of tensions persist in the standard model of particle physics, urging further exploration of the high energy frontier. As such, a high-luminosity upgrade is planned for the LHC (HL-LHC), and the CMS detector will undergo an extensive Phase II upgrade program to prepare for the challenging environment of the HL-LHC. In particular, the ECAL barrel read-out electronics will be upgraded to accommodate the higher event rates and latency required at the HL-LHC. A major benchmark for the CMS physics program at the HL-LHC will be the measurement of di-Higgs production, which allows us to probe the Higgs self-coupling and can illuminate the vacuum stability of the universe. The most sensitive channel for standard model di-Higgs production at the HL-LC is the final state with two photons and two b-quarks will be the most sensitive. In this presentation, I will describe the CMS ECAL detector and the status of the Phase II upgrade for the ECAL barrel. I will also report on the search for di-Higgs production in the two photon and two b-quark final state with Run 2 data, and the prospects for the search at the HL-LHC.

John Alison, Carnegie Mellon:

Di-Higgs Production at the LHC: Current Status and Future Prospects The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics is a spectacularly successful theory that is known to be fundamentally incomplete. The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider is, on one hand, the final missing piece of the SM and, on the other, a window into what lies beyond. Processes involving pairs of Higgs bosons are a sensitive probe of new physics and will ultimately allow the shape of the (in)famous Higgs potential to be directly explored experimentally. I will discuss the motivations and experimental challenges of searching for Di-Higgs production at the LHC. Emphasis will be placed on the dominant hh->4b channel.

Zeynep Demiragli, Boston:

Dark Matter Search The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN are at the energy frontier of particle physics, searching for answers to fundamental questions of nature. In particular, dark matter (DM) presents strong evidence for physics beyond the standard model (SM). However, there is no experimental evidence of its non-gravitational interaction with SM particles. If DM has non-gravitational interactions with the SM particles, we could be producing the DM particles in the proton-proton collisions at the LHC. While the DM particles would not produce an observable signal in the detector, they may recoil with large transverse momentum against visible particles resulting in an overall transverse momentum imbalance in the collision event. In this talk, I will review the searches for DM particles in these missing momentum final states at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment.

Rachel Yohay, FSU:

talk 1: Searches for Exotic Higgs Decays at CMS Although the 125 GeV Higgs scalar displays spin, parity, and fermionic and bosonic couplings consistent with those predicted by the Standard Model (SM), constraints on its branching ratio to invisible or non-SM final states are only at the 20-30% level. Direct searches for Higgs decays to invisible or non-SM final states offer further insights into the structure of the Higgs sector, specifically whether it consists of the single doublet of the Standard Model, or multiple doublets as proposed by many theories that extend the Standard Model. In this talk, I will present recent results on searches using data collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector for Higgs decays to non-SM final states, focusing on decays that proceed via new light Higgs states. Along with general search strategies and interpretations of the current data in terms of two-Higgs-doublet models, dedicated methods for reconstructing low-transverse-momentum and boosted particles characteristic of such decays will be discussed.

talk 2: Operation of the CMS Pixel Detector Since 2017 The interaction point of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is surrounded by pixelated silicon sensors that form the heart of the CMS charged particle tracking system. The currently operating pixel detector was installed in February 2017 as part of the CMS Phase 1 upgrade plan, replacing the original nine-year-old detector whose readout electronics were not suited to the expected event rates of Runs 2 and 3 of the Large Hadron Collider. With a pixel size of 100 x 150 microns, the pixel detector is designed to maintain a hit resolution in the transverse(longitudinal) coordinate of ~20(50) microns or better for tracks with transverse momentum above 10 GeV. The high resolution of the pixel detector allows for the efficient reconstruction of, on average, 30 primary pp interaction vertices per event, as well as secondary vertices characteristic of b quark jets. In this talk, I will present the motivation for and design of the new pixel detector, the successes and challenges of its operation so far, and its impacts on CMS particle reconstruction.

Michalis Bachtis, UCLA:

talk 1: Searches for heavy new resonances decaying to di-bosons with CMS detector at 13 TeV A search for heavy resonances decaying to pairs of heavy electroweak bosons will be presented. The search is deploying novel signal extraction techniques and jet substructure to improve sensitivity. Results from recent LHC data at 13 TeV will be presented along with future prospects for Run III.

talk 2: Implementation of a Kalman Filter in FPGAs for the upgrade of the CMS Barrel Muon Trigger in Run III and HL-LHC new algorithm is proposed to measure the momentum of muons in the CMS detector in real time using data from the Drift Tube and Resistive Plate Chambers in the central region of the detector. The algorithm features a Kalman filter implemented with DSP cores in modern FPGAs to provide momentum measurement with and without vertex constraint enabling displaced particle searches and improving efficiency while reducing the trigger rate. Details of the firmware implementation, performance and results from CMS data-taking will be presented

Andrew Whitbeck, Texas Tech:

Observing the invisible: missing energy/momentum signatures at accelerators & their implications for new physics Elucidating the non-gravitational interactions of dark matter motivates searches for new physics with missing energy/momentum signatures at accelerators. At the LHC, WIMPs are actively being searched for in the context of, among other models, Supersymmetric extensions to the SM (SUSY) which predict new sources of events with missing energy and high multiplicities of SM particles. New results from searches at CMS for R-parity conserving SUSY using 13 TeV proton-proton collisions will be discussed along with their implications for the hierarchy problem. While these results are an important piece of the program for testing WIMP dark matter, a growing need to fully explore the thermal dark matter paradigm was recently highlighted by the community-driven Cosmic Visions white paper. Among the most unconstrained regions of thermal dark matter parameter space is that of so-called light dark matter (LDM), 1 MeV < m_{DM} < 1 GeV. A new class of experiments will be described which will provide the necessary sensitivity to test many models of thermal dark matter in this LDM region of parameter space. Experimental challenges of fixed target experiments, such as LDMX and M^3, looking for LDM will be discussed along with prospects for applying CMS detector technology to address these challenges.

Andreas Jung, Purdue:

talk 1: Top quark physics at the precision frontier The talk will highlight latest results on top quark physics at CMS employing pp collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. New results from other experiments and center of mass energies will also be discussed. With millions of top quarks already collected at the LHC top quark physics enters the precision era. Differential cross section measurements and top quark property measurements, in particular angular correlations, are challenging the Standard Model predictions. The intimate connection of the top quark to the Higgs Boson is scrutinized by highly precise direct measurements of the top quark mass, with alternative approaches entering the precision realm as well. The talk concludes with implications for the SM and an outlook towards the ultimate precision frontier at the high-luminosity phase of the LHC.

talk 2: A new CMS forward pixel detector for the high-luminosity phase of the LHC The high-luminosity phase of the LHC provides unprecedented numbers of proton-proton collisions and in turn enormous amounts of top quarks for extremely precise measurements. The talk will outline the design challenge for the forward silicon pixel detector in order to address the high radiation environment in the inner CMS detector region at the HL-LHC of about 1.2 Grad. The large number of pileup in any proton-proton collision commands a drastically increased number of pixels to maintain a low occupancy and viable track reconstruction. Simultaneously, the acceptance of the pixel detector is increased in the forward and backward region allowing for better physics analysis reach. The talk discusses the current design and the solutions for the significant challenge of removing about 40 kW of heat produced by the Silicon pixel detector under normal operation. The talk concludes with presenting a physics performance study showing the non-SM discovery potential at the HL-LHC.

David Sperka, Boston:

Higgs Couplings and New Physics from the Golden Channel Two of the major physics goals of the CMS experiment at the LHC are the study of the properties of the Higgs boson and the search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics. I will show how the four lepton final state, which was often referred to in the past as the golden channel for Higgs discovery, can be used to accomplish both of these missions. The H->ZZ->4l decay mode provides the most precise measurement of the Higgs boson mass, can be used to measure differential cross sections, and plays a key role in the extraction of the Higgs boson couplings. I will discuss these measurements and their importance in constraining indirectly BSM physics, in particular models with extended Higgs sectors and those that predict exotic Higgs decays. I will also show how the four lepton final state can be used to search directly for new physics. I will focus on the search for a Z' particle predicted by a relatively little known BSM model that may be able to explain multiple experimental anomalies such as the possible reports of Lepton Flavor University Violation in b->sll processes and the lack of dark matter signal at direct detection experiments. All of these measurements and searches will continue to produce important physics results throughout the lifetime of the HL-LHC, and I will discuss the prospects for the future.

Julie Hogan, Bethel:

Searches for vector-like quarks at CMS: At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, proton collisions at extremely high energies could allow production of particles that are no longer found in nature. The standard model (SM) of particles and forces is amazingly accurate, but we know this model has significant gaps. This suggest new physics is out there in the form of new particles or interactions. Heavy fermions called "vector-like quarks" (VLQs) are motivated by new physics models that seek to resolve the mass scale discrepancy between the Higgs boson and the Planck mass. VLQs are predicted to decay into less massive particles like top quarks or bosons, which gain large momenta compared to their mass. If these secondary particles decay to quarks they leave fascinating signatures in CMS as large showers of radiation that can be analyzed using jet substructure techniques. I will present recent VLQ searches from CMS and the jet substructure methods that make them possible, exploring how deep neural network identification methods could provide a better handle on these elusive new particles.

Nhan Viet Tran, FNAL:

talk 1: Fast & Furious 10: triggers, ML, and computing at the LHC and beyond With increasingly complex collision environments at the LHC and concurrently growing data rates, more sophisticated detector and reconstruction methods are required to preserve the LHC program. However, this cannot coincide with an upsurge of computational and processing time. I will discuss plans for the CMS hardware trigger in the HL-LHC era and the role of advanced reconstruction techniques and the potential for machine learning implementations in the trigger FPGA hardware. Finally I will show recent results relating this work to advances in computing which could revolutionize future high level trigger and offline computing architectures at the LHC and other large scale experiments like those in the neutrino program.

talk 2: Boosting light new physics at the LHC and LDMX Searching for new physics in dijets at hadron colliders is a classic well-motivated strategy. However, as the LHC settles into a long period of data-taking at 13 TeV, improvements to the traditional search program are incremental. I will present new techniques to greatly extend the dijet search phase space to regions unexplored since the 1980s. I will also detail how such searches have a connection to dark sector searches at the LHC. Finally, I will talk more generally about extending searches for light thermal dark matter to the MeV-GeV range and new experimental approaches such as the proposed LDMX (Light Dark Matter eXperiment).

Indara Suarez, Boston:

A Stop to Natural SUSY? Questions surrounding the measured value of the Higgs mass as well as astrophysical evidence for Dark Matter suggest that new particles and/or interactions are awaiting discovery. With the significant increase in collision energy and the large datasets of Run 2, it may be possible that data from the Large Hadron Collider will provide evidence for the existence of partners to the top quark. I will discuss the ongoing searches for Supersymmetric partners of the top quark, called top squarks or "stops", and how their discovery could shed light onto the nature of the lightness of the Higgs mass and Dark Matter. My talk will focus on the prospects for the full Run 2 dataset, the detector upgrades that will lay the foundation for exploiting the HL-LHC data, and possible future directions in our search for physics beyond the Standard Model.

Ketino Kaadze, Kansas State:

Exploring the Higgs Sector with the Tau Leptons The observation of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC has opened a new era for particle physics, where characterization of this new object is of crucial importance. Tau leptons are highly important for understanding the true nature of the Higgs boson. The di-tau decay of the Higgs boson is a key channel for direct measurement of Higgs to fermion couplings as well as for significant constraints of Higgs to vector boson couplings. These measurements allow testing CP-violating effects in the Higgs sector. In this talk, I will present recent results on observation of the Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons and on constraints of the Higgs couplings, as well as discuss future prospects for exploring the Higgs sector with di-tau decay mode.

Christopher Rogan, Kansas:

Studying invisible particles at colliders with Recursive Jigsaw Reconstruction At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), many new physics signatures feature pair-production of massive particles with subsequent direct or cascading decays to weakly interacting particles, such as SUSY scenarios with conserved R-parity, or Higgs decaying to two leptons and two neutrinos through W bosons, often motivated by models of new physics which attempt to mitigate the hierarchy problem in the Standard Model and explain the identity of Dark Matter. While final states containing multiple invisible particles represent an opportunity for discovery of new physics phenomena, they also present a unique experimental challenge; the kinematic information lost through particles escaping detection makes fully reconstructing these collision events impossible. In order to address this shortcoming special kinematic variables are used to partially reconstruct these events, providing sensitivity to properties of the particles appearing in them, including masses and even their spin correlations. We introduce a systematic prescription, Recursive Jigsaw Reconstruction, for generating a preferred kinematic basis of observables developed to study final states with invisible particles at HEP experiments, specifically catered to each case of interest. Using the examples of single W boson production and slepton pair production at the LHC, the motivation and derivation of these observables are described, along with comparisons to previously existing approaches. Generalizations to more complicated decay topologies are also discussed, including fully leptonic top quark pair production (resonant and non-resonant), its supersymmetric analogue of stop pair-production with subsequent decays to b-quarks, leptons, and neutrinos, and several examples involving both SM and BSM Higgs decays. We will also include a summary of recent LHC results using these methods.

Isobel Ojalvo, Princeton:

Higgs to Tau Tau Observation Discovered approximately 40 years ago using just a handful of events from the SPEAR experiment, the tau lepton was an unexpected addition to the zoo of fundamental Standard Model particles. Due to its very short lifetime, the tau lepton is normally only possible to detect in its decay to lighter leptons and mesons and in a hadron collider it can be very easily mistaken for a quark or gluon jet! This makes the triggering, reconstruction and identification of the tau lepton very difficult, however, if the decay products of the tau lepton can be well reconstructed then this particle serves as a candle for the study of a 125 GeV Standard Model higgs boson in its decays to fermions. Within the past year, the first observation of the Higgs in its decay to Taus was announced at CMS and at ATLAS. We discuss this exciting result, along with recent advances in tau trigger, reconstruction and identification which made this observation possible as well as prospects for future measurements at the LHC.

Alberto Belloni, UMD:

talk 1: Radiation tolerance of plastic scintillators The experiments at the LHC are expected to accumulate up to 300 fb-1 of data before the major upgrades, known as the “Phase-II” upgrades, are installed. This talk presents studies on the longevity of the active materials used in the barrel and endcap hadronic calorimeters. I will present results of in-situ measurements of the light output as a function of integrated luminosity and studies of light output as a function of dose using various other sources of irradiation both for the current materials and for potential alternative materials that are less susceptible to radiation damage. I will also present results on radiation damage as a function of dose, dose rate, and environmental conditions, and investigate how material composition affects radiation tolerance.

talk 2: Emerging Jets signatures of a composite Dark Sector in the CMS detector… and other long-lived states Many extensions of the standard model (including SUSY) predict new particles with long lifetimes, such that the position of their decay is measurably displaced from their production vertex, and particles that give rise to other non-conventional signatures. This talk presents recent results of searches for long-lived particles and other non-conventional signatures obtained using data recorded by the CMS experiment at Run-II of the LHC. I will particularly focus on a model of dark-QCD with a peculiar signature consisting of emerging jets.

Associate Professors (or equivalent)

Oliver Gutsche, FNAL:

Future science projects promise exciting new discoveries and insights. They will come with a price: a significant increase in scale and complexity. These new scientific devices will produce unprecedented data volumes. The data will have to be stored and processed. And in all of this, the analysis of these huge data volumes will be the biggest challenge. The computing will need to be as large and as sophisticated as the devices themselves. In this talk, I will describe new innovative computing approaches to handle these computing needs. I will use one of these projects, the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), as an example. The HL-LHC is the next stage of the highest energy particle collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. It is planned to come online in 2026. The LHC experiments don't work in isolation on these challenges. They collaborate with each other and are reaching out to the community. The goal is to work on cross-experiment and cross-discipline solutions. Which in the end would benefit the whole scientific community.

Sal Rappoccio, Buffalo:

talk 1: Searches: The energy frontier is at a crossroads. Aside from a small gain to 14 TeV center-of-mass energy at the LHC, higher energies in a proton-proton collider will not happen for decades. The Higgs boson discovery has elucidated the mechanism of electroweak symmetry, but does not explain how its mass is so much different from naive quantum-mechanical expectations. Dark matter remains an enigma. Neutrino masses are not explained. Simple solutions to these questions are mostly ruled out. The next steps in collider searches will appear only if the particles are very heavy, or hidden in some way. I will summarize the existing searches, what they mean for future directions at the LHC.

talk 2: Jets and Jet Substructure: The identification of highly Lorentz-boosted objects has become a standard tool at the LHC. Within 10 years, it has gone from an expert-only tool with high degrees of uncertainty, to a well-established part of the LHC program, with precise understanding of jet substructure from both a theoretical and experimental standpoint. I discuss the current state of jet substructure, including jet substructure measurements and boosted object tagging techniques, and possibilities for improvement of systematic uncertainties in the future.

talk 3: Jet mass cross section: A major limitation in the understanding of jets and jet substructure is the precise description of the jet shower for QCD-initiated jets. A major difficulty has been separating the hard and soft portions of the jet in a systematic way to isolate the tunable soft physics while leaving the hard physics unchanged. The precise measurement of the differential production cross section with respect to jet mass is presented, with and without a jet grooming algorithm applied, to disentangle these portions of the jet. The results are presented over a wide range of transverse momenta, and provide stringent tests of cutting-edge resummation calculations of the groomed jet mass.

Sevil Salur, Rutgers:

Studying Hot QCD with Jets The phase diagram of QCD matter has been studied with relativistic heavy ion collisions. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has delivered heavy ion collisions (Pb+Pb) along with reference data of pp and p+Pb collisions since 2010. With its unprecedented reach in energy, LHC explores new regions of the phase diagram of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) that can resolve fundamental questions regarding quark confinement, such as What determines the key features of QCD? and How does the hot QCD respond to jet energy loss?. At Rutgers, we have performed multiple, complementary jet measurements at LHC using the CMS detector to answer these questions. This talk will present an overview of our experimental results that reveal detailed properties of the hot QCD matter.

Francisco Yumiceva, FIT:

talk 1: Light-emitting Top Quarks The LHC near Geneva, Switzerland, has been delivering an unprecedented amount of data, using the most energetic proton beams ever devised. A signature of new physics never before observed could well be hidden in the data that we have recorded using the CMS detector. In this talk, I will describe the most precise measurements of the properties of the top quark, which is the heaviest subatomic particle ever discovered. Top quarks are copiously produced at the LHC thus providing us with an ideal opportunity to use them as a tool to search for new physics. In particular, I will describe our latest result on the measurement of the rate of photons emitted from top quarks. We are living in exciting times where new ideas about the universe can be tested in ways never before possible.

talk 2: Top quarks and gauge bosons Abstract available on request

talk 3: Recent CMS results on top quark physics Abstract available on request

John Paul Chou, Rutgers:

talk 1: New physics searches with multijets at the LHC: The great puzzle of the LHC is the paucity of evidence for new physics, despite over three years of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV. A simple explanation for this fact could be that new physics processes decay predominantly into light (non-top) quarks. Without extra leptons, photons, or missing momentum, Standard Model multijet backgrounds dominate. This is a daunting proposition because theoretical considerations prefer new particles that could easily be as light as 100 GeV. I will begin by considering previous searches for new physics in multijet final states, discussing the pros and cons of the methods used. I will then examine a new technique to search for light pair-produced particles that each decay into four or more light quarks, a topology that arises in natural R-parity-violating supersymmetry. I conclude with a discussion of the potential of this technique for other searches in the context of natural supersymmetry.

talk 2: the MATHUSLA detector proposal: There is substantial theoretical motivation for the production of long-lived particles at the LHC. In this seminar, I will introduce MATHUSLA, a proposed surface level detector above an LHC collision point, which aims to discover ultra-long-lived particles with lifetimes as long as O(1) s, and which would boost the sensitivity of the HL-LHC by orders of magnitude. I begin with a discussion of the theoretical motivations (from naturalness, to baryogenesis, to dark matter), before describing the theory-level detector design. Recent updates on background estimates and technical design for the proposed detector will be presented as well.

Wei Li, Rice:

talk 1: Nearly "Perfect" Quark-Gluon Droplet at the Smallest Scales In high energy collisions of large, heavy nuclei (e.g., Au or Pb), a new state of matter consisting of liberated quarks and gluons is formed at a temperature of a few trillion Kelvins. This "Quark-Gluon Plasma" (QGP), discovered at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (BNL) and the Large Hadron Collider (CERN, Switzerland), is found to exhibit amazing collective behavior as a nearly "perfect" fluid, which flows with close-to-zero viscous dissipation. It was thought that elementary collision systems like proton-proton (pp) or proton-nucleus (pA) are too small and dilute to form a QGP fluid so they were often treated as a reference in understanding the emergence of perfect fluidity in large heavy ion systems. Surprisingly, in recent years, evidence for collective effects and QGP formation has also been revealed in those smallest collisions, when looking at a fraction of rare events releasing largest number of particles. In this talk, I will describe key findings related to the possible formation of the tiniest QGP fluid in pp and pA systems, and discuss their implications to the standard paradigm of heavy ion physics, as well as new opportunities opened up in studying emergent Quantum Chromodynamics phenomena under extreme conditions.

talk 2: Searches for the Chiral Magnetic Effect in nuclear collisions In relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, local chirality imbalance of left- and right-handed quarks may be generated by topological transitions of gluon gauge fields. With the presence of an extremely strong magnetic field in a non-central collision, the chiral magnetic effect (CME) has been predicted to occur, resulting an electric charge separation in the final state. In this talk, I will review the latest status of experimental searches for the chiral magnetic effects in nuclear collisions at RHIC and the LHC, and discuss exciting opportunities with programs planned in the near future.

Chris Neu, UVA:

Particle Detection at the Timing Frontier The ability to unambiguously assign tracks to production vertices will become even more challenging in the High Luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC): While the increase in instantaneous luminosity in the HL-LHC era could afford access to rare processes associated with physics beyond the standard model, the consequent increase of simultaneous p-p collisions within a single bunch crossing -- so-called pileup interactions -- will increase by a factor 4-5 over current running. To meet this challenge, a new particle detection subsystem is being developed for the CMS experiment: The MIP Timing Detector (MTD), a device capable of measuring the calorimetry time-of-arrival for MIPs with a resolution of 30ps. This capability allows for the 25ns bunch crossing to be effectively sub-divided into a series of time exposures; within each exposure, the pileup contribution is reduced to current-LHC levels and the performance of object identification, signal extraction and background rejection is preserved. Hence the pileup mitigation provided by the MTD is an essential component of establishing optimal sensitivity to new physics at CMS in the HL-LHC era. Further, there is an additional benefit to the physics program through the ability to measure the time of flight between production and decay of long-lived particles, a new capability that fundamentally changes the manner in which these searches are conducted at the LHC. In this talk, the details of this new detector and the expected physics performance provided by the MTD will be discussed.

talk 2: Measurement of the top-Higgs Coupling at CMS The discovery of a Higgs particle made by the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 was heralded as a significant advancement in our understanding of the fundamental world. In the post-discovery era, the task turned to characterizing this Higgs boson: to determine whether it is the particle predicted within the context of the standard model (SM) of particle physics – or something altogether different. Essentially all measurements have thus far indicated that this Higgs boson is consistent with the predictions of the SM. However, one crucial characteristic that remained to be measured was the coupling strength between the Higgs boson and the top quark. The top quark is the most massive fundamental particle; given the role of the Higgs field in electroweak symmetry breaking, measurement of the top-Higgs coupling is an essential component of the characterization campaign. Further, the top quark plays a special role in several beyond-the-standard-model frameworks, and these new dynamics are predicted to affect the top-Higgs coupling strength. Hence an observed deviation from the SM prediction for the top-Higgs coupling could be a window to new physics. Therefore this measurement is one of the highest priority goals of the physics program at the LHC. In this talk I will review the current status of the top-Higgs coupling measurement campaign at the CMS experiment and discuss prospects going forward.

Sergo Jindariani, FNAL:

talk 1: Signatures involving charged leptons (electrons and muons) are extremely powerful in hadron collider environment as they allow to suppress large hadronic backgrounds at both online and offline levels of event reconstruction. I will present results from a subset of CMS searches and measurements involving leptons and discuss prospects for High Luminosity LHC. I will also discuss future challenges of lepton reconstruction in Level-1 trigger at high pileup and present advanced machine learning techniques to address them.

talk 2: The LHC Physics Center (LPC) at Fermilab is a regional center focusing on physics analysis, detector operations, and upgrades. The center was established in 2004 and has been steadily growing since then. Currently, it involves over 100 resident scientists with hundreds more visiting every year. The success of the LPC has been demonstrated by its impact on the CMS physics program and detector projects. In this talk, I will discuss the LPC model, present various activities and programs taking place at the center, highlight some of the physics results, and outline future directions.

Conor Henderson, Alabama:

Searches for Extra Dimensions with CMS Discovery of extra dimensions of space would revolutionize our view of the universe. They may also provide a solution to the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model, through modifications of the strength of the gravitational force. This talk explores the theoretical motivations to search for evidence of extra dimensions in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, and presents recent results of such searches by the CMS experiment.

Kristian Hahn, Northwestern:

talk 1: Searches Searches for dark matter (DM) have become a major focus of the LHC physics programmes. Results from Run-2 of the LHC showcase the ability of collider searches to compliment the sensitivity of direct and indirect detection experiments. In this talk I review the strategy and status of DM searches with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and show how recent CMS results strongly constrain models of WIMP DM. I will explore the unique sensitivity of several DM search channels, highlighting LHC constraints on low mass DM and spin-independent DM couplings. The talk will also consider the evolution of DM searches toward Run-3 of the LHC, concluding with a discussion of new ideas for extending the reach of future collider-based DM searches.

talk 2: HL-LHC The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will produce roughly 200 overlapping proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing on average. To mitigate the impact of these extreme conditions, the HL-LHC upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment will introduce tracking information in its hardware (L1) trigger. A new Track Finding system will reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles from each LHC beam crossing and transmit these tracks to the downstream trigger system. The technical requirements for L1 Track Finding are extraordinary; the system must cope with the enormous data rates generated from the Tracker detector while simultaneously obeying a stringent 4 microsecond latency limit for track reconstruction. The CMS experiment will confront these challenges using an FPGA-based architecture that implements spatial and time-multiplexed data processing. In this talk I will review on-going R&D for the CMS Track Finder, which includes the evaluation of multi-gigabit links and system-on-chip technologies, as well as the investigation of algorithmic optimizations that capitalize on the design of modern FPGAs.

Yen-Jie Lee, MIT:

talk 1: Probing the Quark-Gluon Plasma using Heavy Quarks with the CMS detector Heavy quarks are powerful tools for the study the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions. The modification of the heavy flavor meson spectra in heavy ion collisions is expected to be different from light flavors due to the heavier mass of the charm and beauty quarks. The nuclear modification factors (RAA) of heavy-flavor particles provides insights into the flavor dependence of in-medium parton energy loss, and azimuthal anisotropy coefficient (vn) of heavy-flavor particles provides information about the degree of the thermalization of the bulk medium. Moreover, the measurement of the production of strange heavy-flavor mesons could give insights on harmonization mechanism of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. With the experimental data, the transport and thermodynamical properties of the medium could be extracted using phenomenological models. Over the past few years, using the large statistics proton-proton and PbPb samples collected at 5.02 TeV in LHC Run II, high precision measurements of heavy-flavor mesons have been performed with the CMS detector. Recent results and their implications will be summarized in this talk.

talk 2: Study of long-range angular correlations of charged particles in high multiplicity e+e- collisions with archived ALEPH data First results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles emitted in e+e− collisions using 730 pb−1 of data collected between 91 and 209 GeV with the ALEPH detector at LEP are presented. With the archived data, the correlation functions are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity η (rapidity y) and azimuthal angle ϕ with respect to the electron-positron beam axis and the event thrust axis. Short-range correlations in Δη (Δy), which are studied with e+e− annihilations which reveal jet-like correlations. Long-range azimuthal correlations are studied differentially as a function of charged particle multiplicity. Those results are compared to event generators and are complementary to the studies of the ridge signals in high multiplicity pp, pA and AA collisions at the RHIC and the LHC.

Kenichi Hatekeyama, Baylor

Searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with the CMS experiment and future outlook The Higgs boson discovery by the CMS and ATLAS experiments at CERN was a major milestone for particle physics and marked another success of the standard model, our current best theory for elementary particles. In this talk, I will discuss the implications of the Higgs discovery and our endeavor to shed light on the nature of the dark matter and gauge hierarchy problem through searches for supersymmetry using the data collected with the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A novel experimental technique has been developed for these searches. I will also discuss our effort to upgrade the CMS detector systems for future data taking and physics potentials with the upgraded detector.